WOUND CARE

The last few days have sort of normalized regarding wound care for the MEAT FLAP.

wound_care_medical_supplies

Nothing has changed. It looks the same as the first day I removed the dressings to take a peek. The only difference I could see was a greyish creamy matter at one end of the opening. Any changes, to me, are to be regarded with suspicion and concern for more potential complications.

I had put in a call to a resource referred to me by the bedside nurse after my procedure called “Wound Care Clinic”. She listened patiently to Matt’s description of what the surgeon told him to do to care for the incision, then she said, “There are better ways”, like in this whispery, far-off, mystical tone.

“Better ways,” Matt and I repeated looking at each other. Huh. She wrote the contact name and number down on my discharge instructions, and away we went.

Then, after a few days of this seemingly ridiculous routine of Matt performing his interpretation of what the doctor instructed him to do each morning and evening, we decided we needed to see this Wound Care specialist.

florence-nightingale-wound-care

Florence Nightingale

Today Matt and I went to the Wound Care Clinic at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. The nurse, Sue Wilson, was like a refreshing breeze. She was the Florence Nightingale of Good Sam. She kept reaching out to put a tender hand on my wrist or hand, to express reassurance, that she was truly sorry that I’d had to endure the disease and procedures that I had, and she wants to help as many patients as she can take the complication out of their post operative wounds. There were a number of patients waiting to see her in the lobby.

She listened to Matt regale the story of Dr. Childs and the meso-rectal envelope and the stoma-gone-wrong to the hernia “blow-out” and repair surgery, then the instructions that Dr. Tseng had given to care for the “meat flap”.

Florence, I mean Sue, proceeded to lay me back on the exam table and examine the unbandaged wound. “Well, it looks great,” she said, mildly impressed. “It’s a clean cut, consistent color; it’s been well cared for” (I gave Matt a high-five later). Then she warned me she would clean and poke around to inspect it, that it may hurt. I noted that I don’t really feel hurt with this one. Apparently, in ostomy sites, which this was, nerves are damaged and it’s common that people will not feel pain. (That was our first ah-ha moment. That’s why I did not need my pain meds much after the surgery!)

Then she cleaned inside the wound, and to our surprise, a 5-inch long Q-Tip slid easily into a channel under the skin about 2 inches (Ayayay!). That’s where the infection track went. An infection leaves a trail, like snails do! (Another ah-ha.) Or at least like a train track.

She noted the measurements; how deep the tissue was, how long the incision, how far the channel went…

She then introduced a product that is seaweed (kelp?) -based. It looks like angel hair in a bag. With this, instead of packing with gauze, it helps the tissue stay nourished and it absorbs wound drainage. The name… blah blah, it’s a new one, …KALTOSTAT. Then she loaded brown paper bag of water-proof bandages that I can wear while showering, some Q-Tips, adhesive protection spray (to make it easier to remove the adhesive bandages from my skin) for me to take.

 

The Last Ah-ha

Now, naturally, I think, Matt and I have been gravely concerned about the cleanliness and preparation of our at-home exam table (the bed) and countertop, hands, etc, to avoid any possibility of introducing a whole new infection to the area. Rightly so. When you cut your finger, you use alcohol, hydrogen peroxide, cotton balls, Neosporin, band-aids for protection, you name it, on the wound to keep it from getting infected. And if you don’t? It gets infected! And the infection gets worse and worse until you do it right for long enough that it heals up.

In this case, that’s not necessary, it turns out!

Sue said, “You can change your dressings every 1-2 days, and if you shower every day, just let the water run over the wound” (??!?). Yeah; just shower like you normally do, and don’t pay any special attention to the incision (?!?!). Soap and water will not hurt anything, it will be good for the cut to be irrigated by the water (!!?!).

Gah? Totally counter-intuitive, no? I knew that the surgeon just knew something we didn’t or he would have given WAY more specific care instructions. So weird.

Other than that, I feel more energy. Kombucha, green tea, lots of fresh turmeric root, ginger, garlic, water… kind of what I usually do, just more of it. I introduced wine last night for the first time in over a week, and I maintain a strict regimen of ice cream after dinner. I can exercise (walking and not too much upper-body stuff), watch Matt work/play out in the garden. In the next few months we will be eating from home-grown bounty!

Anyway, that’s the short story (ha ha) of what’s been up the last few days.

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