COLONOSCOPY IV

Colonoscopy IV is finished!

For a 2-day prep/recovery, the procedure goes rather quickly. I was in at 8:30am and out by 9:10am.

champagne_toastThe doctor had pleasing news when I woke from twilight: clean as a whistle. No polyps, nothing unusual. Hallelujah! Ever since colon cancer in 2012, part of my maintenance plan is annual colonoscopies and scans. I’m on 4 of 5, so after next year’s exam, I can move out to 1 every 3 years, yet will probably continue the annual scans and quarterly blood tests (also normal maintenance protocol) for five more years.

For a polyp garden (my colon), the crop was bad this year. Nevermind the chemo cleanse I got for 8+ months. So, anyway, I have no worries there.

I feel like an easy patient again!

COLON TALK

2/26/12 Sun AM

This morning I set up an online profile on the American Cancer Society website, WhatNext.com, and my first post went like this:

“Whee! I’m on!

Yeah, ‘Oh no‘ is right. What the heck? Ask any of my friends or family and they’ll tell you they are just as surprised as I am about the cancer results. I am 38 years old, healthy as an ox, fabulous lifestyle with good diet, exercise habits and low stress. So, what gives?

All evidence points to genetics. I have a strong family lineage of colon cancer, colitis and IBS, which I am learning all about right now, unfortunately. I am not yet officially diagnosed, by the way, but the colonoscopy results were pretty telling.

It’s 4 days total until my official diagnostic results are available, so my fiancé and I have had lots of time to think and swap stories with others. There seems to be so little attention on colons, and that part of the digestive system; people just don’t talk about it! They are afraid of and embarrassed by their colon/rectal region. Societally, we don’t talk about gas, bowel movements, discomfort, sounds, smells, frequency, etc, etc, you get the idea. It’s all taboo! Why! If more people discussed this incredibly valuable part of our anatomy, wouldn’t there be more education and therefore prevention of cancer and other ailments? YES!

At the beginning of our relationship, my boyfriend (now fiancé) and I were discrete about our colonic behaviors, like everyone else. Over time we just became more accepting and open about our digestion, yet still respectful of each others’ space. If one of us farts, we just open the window and just say, “Good onya, Honey! Get it out!”. And really, better out of ya than in ya, right? This openness and self-observation lead me to eventually get my colonoscopy exam (a whole 15 years earlier than medical recommendation), which turned up a malignant cancerous mass.

Here is an excerpt from an Oregonian article illustrating what makes our society colorectally shy:

“You don’t hear nearly as much about colon cancer as you do about breast cancer or lung cancer or prostate cancer,” he says. “Why? It’s all about the poop. People don’t want to talk about their butts. Have you ever seen a brown ribbon campaign?”

– Jay Lake, cancer survivor, blogger and science fiction writer

“Unfortunately (colon cancer) is a huge source of cancer morbidity, and it gets frightfully little press and is sort of underfunded. I’m not sure why. Maybe because it deals with bowel issues the culture is reticent to discuss. I certainly agree with Jay that there’s not the degree of cultural support, advocacy and marches like you see with breast cancer or prostate cancer.”

– Dr. Kevin Billingsley, the chief of the division of surgical oncology at OHSU 

So there you have it. My advice? Don’t be so afraid or secretive! It only encourages other people to be so, then where are we? A society in denial of a real health problem. All of us have cancer naturally occuring, and our bodies are fighting it off successfully all the time. But when our bodies get overwhelmed, the system breaks down, and the cancer cells get out of control.

Most of us will experience cancer ourselves in our lifetime. Remember, the colon is a PART of our BODY, everybody has one (‘cept for those who had theirs extracted), everybody has problems now and then, but we don’t necessarily know what NORMAL activity is and what’s not normal. I didn’t know that my problems were not normal. I just lived with the discomfort thinking it would naturally pass, as a phase. The same story I heard from my brother and my cousin (who recently had his colon removed from ulcerative colitis infection).

What could I fear? After all, I am young and healthy!”

We think humor needs to be injected into the topic of colon health to encourage people to pay attention to theirs.

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